Sunday, December 09, 2012

Publishers and Agents

Thinking of writing a letter to an agent or a publisher? 

Although I'm positioning myself for self-publishing I am of course pursuing all avenues. Here's the letter I've put together (4th draft) for publishers and agents at this point.

Have any thoughts? Please let me know and I'll make the appropriate changes!

...
...


New York, NY 10003

December 8, 2012

Re: Submissions

Dear Ms ...,

My name is Alistair Vogan. I am a Canadian fiction writer, currently based in the United Arab Emirates. I am writing to you because I would like to submit the first fifteen pages of my novel How To Lose Your Voice Without Screaming. It is, I believe, both off-beat and commercial. In fact, I'm certain it will make you laugh. As a writer and story editor, both here and in North America, I have had the pleasure of working with such creative types as the film director Bruce McCulloch, Saturday Night Live’s Adam Mackay and the cult comedy troupe The Kids In The Hall. I have also been a script consultant for a number of films produced by Lorne Michael’s Broadway Video and Ron Howard and Brian Grazer’s Imagine Entertainment.

How To Lose Your Voice Without Screaming explores, with both humor and sensitivity, what can happen when you repress a big, terrible secret. ...Kingsley Kuchner is a single private business owner living quietly in the Lower East Side of Manhattan in the 1960’s. His life is an empty routine and, though his thoughts are often occupied with Martha, the spirited and exotic woman who lives next door, he is very much alone. Also, he’s haunted by a disembodied voice. Each day this voice tells him the same story. The voice begins its story, then finishes it and begins again. This has been going on for 20 years, and now the voice is growing louder...

At the suggestion of a neighbor, Kingsley meets with a psychiatrist of questionable repute who advises him to write this story out and, "however seemingly impossible," attempt to have it published. Only by doing this, Kingsley is led to believe, will he lose the voice and find true happiness, perhaps even love. Kingsley writes out the story and at the insistence of a publisher finds himself reading it on a popular prime-time broadcast. It is at this moment that he realizes there is something very very special about his cryptic little story. Within minutes of unleashing it upon the American public, the course of his life, the lives of four others and, indeed, American culture are altered irrevocably. As his life spins out of control Kingsley begins to suspect that what he has shared with the world might not be as whimsical or innocuous as he had thought. Finally, with the help of the former society darling, the disgraced Doctor Flees, Kingsley begins a journey of discovery that uncovers a series of truths that are more beautiful and terrifying, and much more dangerous, than he could have ever imagined.

I hope you find it compelling.

Yours sincerely,


Alistair Vogan
971-55-753-....
Pinecrestpictures@gmail.com


To begin to learn How To Lose Your Voice Without Screaming, see the link below:


Prologue - The Push

For more information, please contact:



We would like to gratefully acknowledge assistance provided by:

Ms Susan Watson
Lee Ivan Vogan
Rose Street
P.S. Winn
Simona
Helena
Ben Culhane 
Kingsley Vogan 
Ken McDavitt 
Paddy 
Ocope515 
DonkeyJacket 
Safia Adam
 Sport68 
Robert Bodrog 
Bob Studholme 
Brian Borgford 
Craig Lauzon 
Patreshia Tkach
Chi Diep 
Colin Rivers 
Anum Siddiqui 
Sara Ryan 
Hannah Taha 
Shaikha Alain 
Ayesha Sayed 
Leanne Wherret 
Bruce McCullouch 
Susan Cavan 
Tanya Nguyen 
Margaret Lambert 
Peggy Vogan 
Mahmood Farra 
Barbara Vogan 
ZeBeDee 
Paul Marlow 
Alison Belsham 
Brian L 
Melyat 
Jagermeister8 
and 
Sir William Newman 
editors and story consultants at The Ivan Von Noshrilgram Foundation, Antarctica.)    

Copyright 2000 (Alistair Avery Vogan / the Von  Noshrilgram Foundation)

3 comments:

Bob Studholme said...

Not sure about the quotes around off-beat and commercial. It looks as though you don't really mean them. There's also italics on a 'this' that looks unintentional.
don't think you need to include the note about 'of questionable repute' here, as you do describe Flees later. Similarly with the 'however seemingly impossible'. It doesn't move the story forward and raises a question you don't answer. Other than that, I think this works.

Alistair Vogan said...

Yes. The quotes around "off-beat" and "commercial" were written for a particular agent who mentioned that she believed these two qualities could exist in fiction. Sent to another agent this could confuse. Good eye. I might have sent it out again without noticing that.

Thanks Bob! Appreciated.

Alistair Vogan said...

Yes. The quotes around "off-beat" and "commercial" were written for a particular agent who mentioned that she believed these two qualities could exist in fiction. Sent to another agent this could confuse. Good eye. I might have sent it out again without noticing that.

Thanks Bob! Appreciated.